Skip to content
Svri Oak Foundation Research Seminar Parenting, Gender Socialisation And The Prevention Of Child Abuse And Neglect In Low And Middle Income Countries

SVRI Oak Foundation research seminar: Parenting, gender socialisation and the prevention of child abuse and neglect in low- and middle-income countries, 23 September 2010, London, UK

    The harmful effects of child abuse and neglect on child development are increasingly understood as important for prevention of child sexual abuse victimization and sexual violence perpetration.  Parenting and the home setting is one of the influences on risk of abuse in childhood and the gender socialization of boys and girls.  Parenting factors have been found to buffer and mediate the effects of wider family and community factors on children’s development.  Parenting interventions are an important and potentially fundamental approach to the prevention of child maltreatment and promotion of safe, nurturing, non-violent home settings – both in the immediate family and in the next generation of young men. A number of parenting interventions have been shown to reduce harsh parenting, prevent or reduce child maltreatment and improve child outcomes. The extent to which these interventions translate across countries and cultures is however something that remains unknown.

    To address these gaps and others, with support from the Oak Foundation, the SVRI has commissioned Wendy Knerr from the Dept of Social Policy and Social Work, University of Oxford and Laura McCloskey, Professor of Public Health, University of Illinois to undertake desk reviews on parenting interventions to prevent child neglect and abuse in low-and-middle income countries and models and interventions for gender re-socialisation and the elimination of misogyny to prevent child maltreatment. The research seminar was held to showcase the initial findings of each review and address the following questions:

    • What do we know about parenting and home environment strengthening interventions to reduce exposure to abuse and neglect globally? What has worked and have they been evaluated?
    • What do we know about parenting interventions aimed at transforming gender socialisation of children globally? What has worked and have they been evaluated?
    • What are the methodologies used and lessons learned from promising practices?
    • Have any of these promising practices been scaled up or replicated elsewhere?
    • What are the issues that need to be considered in adaptation of effective programmes for lower-income settings?
    • What are the gaps in policy and how should we address this?
    • What are the gaps and priorities to consider for research in the area?

    Presentations

    Interventions to strengthen biological or social parenting and the home setting to prevent sexual abuse of children and to influence the gender socialisation of boys
    Parenting and the prevention of child maltreatment in low-and middle-income countries – a systemic review of interventions, and a discussion of prevention of the risks of future violent behaviour among boys
    Situation analysis of child care, neglect and abuse in India
    Parenting, gender socialisation and the prevention of child abuse and neglect in low- and middle-income countries (Sub-Saharan Africa)
    Selected bibliography for Sub-Saharan Africa review – Carol Bower

    Resources

    SVRI research seminar report: Parenting, gender socialisation and the prevention of child abuse and neglect in low- and middle-income countries

    This Post Has 0 Comments

    Leave a Reply

    Svri Stay

    QUICK LINKS

    CONTACT

    Email: svri@svri.org
    Address: Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI)
    2nd Floor, Lourie Place, 179 Lunnon Street, Hillcrest, Pretoria, Gauteng 0083, South Africa

    Privacy Notice

    SVRI NPC (2019/197466/08)

    Subscribe to our newsletter

    Svri New Look Feb22 23

    CONTACT

    Email: svri@svri.org
    Address: South Africa

    Privacy Notice

    SVRI NPC (2019/197466/08)

    BECOME A MEMBER

    Become a member
    Search
    thinking
    Back To Top